Inspirational Natural Homes

Holy moly!! If this doesn’t inspire someone to build a natural home, I don’t know what will. Of course, you have to be into the kind of storybook homes this house appears to be…and I am. I look at this and say, “See! Look at the beautiful home we can make with our own hands!!” *sigh*

I’m still reading The Hand-Sculpted House by Ianto Evans and friends, so we haven’t actually started making our floor plans or mini-models. With that being said, I’m not at the stage where I’ve thought about putting a balcony or porch onto our home. Ziggy’s article on porches was not only inspirational, but very helpful by pointing out the benefits of having a porch and/or balcony. *Arial looks at the cottage again* SWOON!

Share Your Dreams of a Natural Home

I get giddy inside when I think about the cottage we’re going to build! DREAM WITH ME, PEOPLE!!! I imagine us (me and those faithful visitors) sitting around a cozy room with a fire burning in the hearth and a cup of coffee or hot chocolate warming our hands. And we chat, sharing what we’d love to see in our home we build with our very own hands. What features would you like to have?

Do you want a Hobbit hole? Do you want an English-style, thatched-roof cottage like the one pictured here? Do you want bookshelves built into the very walls? A wood-burning stove toasting your buns as it warms the couch built right into the walls? Have you thought about having a bedroom loft? An old-fashioned kitchen with herbs drying from the ceiling? Perhaps you’re not thinking of building a home, but want to add unique features to your backyard. A fireplace built from cob? Flowerbeds and garden walls with your own artwork sculpted into the surface? Natural, hand-sculpted benches?

Perhaps if we share our dreams and aspirations, it will help shape them into something more solid. Perhaps we can be an inspiration to each other, encouraging our ideas. I’d love to hear your plans and dreams if you have them! If you don’t have any right now, perhaps this will plant the seed for those ideas to grow.

If you find you’d like to leave more than a comment, I encourage you to write about it on your own blog and post the permalink here. Express yourself!! Don’t limit your prose to the meager space of the comment box! And provide pictures in your blog if you can!

That’s my two pence…

Arial 😉

Advertisements

Cob House Building – Updates and Adaptability

Rain, Hail and Weeds – Oh My!

More rain over the weekend, but we were able to do some cleaning up in the yard before the water and hail hammered us on Sunday. We’ve had a pile of junk sitting along the side of the garage for quite some time now. Part of the pile was concrete and rubble from previous construction done on the front walkway of the house. About a month ago, we were able to get that hauled off…and it took quite a dent in our pocketbook (but that’s relative, of course…one person’s fortune is another’s night out). Concrete is pretty expensive to get rid of, sad to say. With that out of the way, we regained about 25 square feet and had to wait awhile to save up for the next bunch of junk to be taken away.

However, I learned from our refuse company that having a bin delivered to your house for a week or so costs less than $100, so I jumped on the chance to get rid of the rest of the junk. We’ve now gained another 20 square feet of land! Woot!! It’s looking more and more like a yard and less and less like a scrap pile.

Although, with all this rain, the weeds were rapidly taking over the parts of the yard I haven’t yet done. *groan* I brought the weed whacker out and chopped down what was reaching knee-height. It’s not grass, but it’s green! LOL…and manageable now. We learned a new trick – using cardboard to cover weeded or grassed areas. Not only is the lack of sun supposed to kill the weeds/grass, but the cardboard breaks down to make richer soil. Nice. It’s free covering (who doesn’t have a few boxes laying around OR isn’t able to pick some up from their local grocer) so we’re going to try that out and see what happens to the experimental patch of weeds. Instructions: Continue reading

Weed Pulling and Landscaping – Preparing for Cob

Cob House Basics – Tilling the Earth

Before any kind of building – cob not withstanding – one must prepare the land. In order to build with cob, I need dirt…the main ingredient. As such, I am working to till the earth in the backyard and scrape off the top 6-8 inches to save for building material. With the rain gone for the moment, the ground is soft and easy to work with. Yahoo! I’m taking advantage of the climate conditions in an otherwise unforgiving landscape known as the desert. So, today I spent a couple of hours weeding. I love the smell of the rich earth and I’m happy to announce that we seem to have very clay-like soil…something I’ll need to build with cob. I used my spade, turned over the soil, picked out the weeds and used the rototiller. My feet just sank into the fresh-turned soil. Ahhh!! Continue reading

An Upside-Down World: Modern Construction vs. Natural Building

I subscribe to a web site and their newsletter (The Year of Mud: Cob & Natural Building) and they just posted that their cob house was featured in Yes! Magazine. He also says in his newsletter:

“Apparently, cob is a ‘wacky’ material, even though half of the world’s population live or work in earthen structures – ha! Well, anyway, Forbes has deemed cob “wacky” enough to include in their latest article, Homes Made From Wacky Materials. They’ve got my house in the mix.

By the way Brian Liliola’s house is pictured 7 of 19 in the gallery of pictures. Their house is lumped into the group of people who are making homes from garbage dumpsters. I’m not knocking people making homes out of dumpsters, but you have to admit, that’s a little bizarre. Points to them, however, for recycling materials!! My point, though is cob houses have been a part of traditional construction methods since the Medieval times!! As I’m reading this article, I’m shaking my head and a little part of me gets irate, so I’m going to get on my soap box.

WARNING: YOU ARE ABOUT TO ENTER A SPEW ZONE! Continue reading

Updates – RAIN!

Anyone know the photographer of this photo? I'd love to link to their web site.

Rain is good news and bad news: Good news because it’s soaking into the ground and making it softer and easier to work with; bad news because I have to wait until it stops raining to get to work AND we can’t play outside with the poor energetic dog. The timing is good, though. I threw my back out and can’t do any work in the garden anyway! Funny how the Universe provides, no?

It’s dangerous in these unproductive times because my husband and I love to dream and plan and brainstorm ideas. Meaning, we come up with NEW things to add to our list of projects! We get the Handyman magazine, which is FULL of wonderful DIY ideas, tips and projects. Little ideas turn into our brainstorming sessions and away we go. Inspired by a resurfacing project for fixing old, cement stairs, we’re going to attempt repairing the back cement patio, which has cracks and chunks missing. Though we have a cement mixer, we’re not sure if it works and we’ve never worked with cement before. Won’t know until you try, eh? The plans are set, ideas are swirling. We’ll see how well we do with that project this spring.

I told my husband, “I sure hope all these plans work out like we’re dreaming they will.” He says, “Everything else that we do together and we’ve put our mind to always works out. Why not these?” OMG I love that man o’  mine!!!

Cob Housing – My Thoughts

As I thumb through The Hand-Sculpted House, I get excited about the possibilities! There are so many wonderful things we can incorporate into the projects we’re looking to create as our experiments and through our learning. Notice the marble shelf incorporated into this bathroom wall! Even the creative vine sculpture framing the alcove, all built into the bathroom wall. Unique features throughout a home, or what we hope to implement in the backyard, adds such a unique flavor. No one else on the planet will have these features.

Look at the shelves molded into the wall and beside the stove of this picture! Even the detail of the small stones by the floor. All of these images spark ideas of what I would like to add to our home when we eventually build our own cob house.

Also, cob houses seem to be a little more flexible when laying out electrical outlets and plumbing fixtures, as opposed to the slightly more rigid structure of the earth bag houses. It just seems to be a more creative process, in my opinion.

Project Notes: Dog Run Wall & Bench

Artistic example of a cob bench

We’re adapting the plan as we go along. Originally, we thought to create a wall (about 3-4 feet tall and about 25-30 feet long) to section off the designated dog run area with a flower bed (about 1.5 feet tall) that would curve and double as a seating area in front of the fire pit. However, now that we’re looking at the cob building techniques instead of the earth bag construction, we like the idea of incorporating the artistic and sculpting features of cob, so we’re expanding the concept.

We anticipate the dog run will be about 4 feet wide and stretch all along the fence on the north-side of the yard. The wall will be simple – just straight and we’ll top it with the same bull-nose red brick we have at the front of the house on the retaining wall and flower bed. We’ll also stucco the sides and paint it the butter-yellow the rest of the house is in (which is now starting to look white). So that hasn’t really changed. Continue reading